Wednesday, June 29, 2005

Build on the Middle Schoolers' ideas . . .

From: Deshotel, Clopha
Sent: Wednesday, June 29, 2005 10:24 AM
To: Empric, Scott
Subject: For a Writers Workshop? Geography Game Assistance Sought

FYI only

Preparation Begins For Another ASC Workshop - Fall Semester


Sent: Wednesday, June 29, 2005 10:29 AM
Subject: RE: Geography Game Assistance Sought

Look at this link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intercontinental_Peace_Bridge

From: Deshotel, Clopha
Sent: Wednesday, June 29, 2005 10:14 AM
Subject: FW: Geography Game Assistance Sought

Hello from HCC.

I am looking for students to help with this educational game (first draft in pdf).

Monday, June 20, 2005

Scriptwriting for video

Abraham will take the time to teach Bobby what the common spelling patterns are in the written form of spoken English.

These are known as the phonograms. Phono= sound + written= gram.


Clopha Deshotel, Bridgeport CT
>>Riggs-teachers@yahoogroups.com wrote:
>Date: Sat, 18 Jun 2005 17:08:20 -0700 (PDT)
From: Cindy xxxx@xxx.com
Subject: DVD

Hello! I am teaching my 10th adult class for parents who are teaching their children the WRTR using the Riggs material (WSRRT). We are recording my instruction using a DVD recorder and plan to make it available to those taking the class. It is really exciting to see the progress that's being made. I am also in the process of preparing to teach a workshop for the staff of a nearby Christian school in August, and we plan to record it also. It makes a huge difference in the success and confidence level of the teacher when they have a supportive mentor and a visual reminder of the instruction would multiply it greatly. I've tutored approximately 25 students of varying ages (5 yr. old through 41 yr. old) over a 13 year span, after using it in a Christian school (grades 2 & 3; 4-6) for 2 years. I'm sure there will be a big demand for the video/DVD. Joyfully! Cindy (IL)

Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2005 19:59:10 -0000
From: "mrsmom" Subject:
Re: Documentary Home Movie Possible?

In Riggs-teachers@yahoogroups.com, clophad@n... wrote:

> I do hope some who are reading this will consider making a documentary home movie to help make the most of what Riggs offers with WSRRT.

>>Date: Wed, 8 Jun 2005 14:20:25 -0400
>>From: "Wes Sc..." > Subject: Re: Digest
>>I used Riggs in my Fifth grade class. Attached is a letter I gave my students to encourage them to continue to learn the sounds. Our test results were very satisfying.
Wesley xxxxxxxx, Georgia

----- Original Message -----
From: clophad@n...
To: Riggs-teachers@yahoogroups.com
Cc: prhm@f... ; schuessw@b... ; latabb@c...Sent:
Wednesday, June 08, 2005 11:22 AMSubject:
RE: [Riggs-teachers] DigestAnyone on this list who trained your child(ren) with WSRRT like to discuss helping others with this story below?
For Peer Tutoring - younger helping older and older helping younger
Date: Tue, 31 May 2005 14:45:34 -0400From: clophad@n...
Subject: For Peer Tutoring - younger helping older andolder helping youngerLike to help distribute it far and wide?

Have this in Korean and Japanese.
The Riggs Institute
HOW TO MOTIVATE AN OLDER STUDENT WHO READS BUT CAN'T WRITE, SPELL OR THINK ALL THAT WELL! by Myrna McCulloch

"But, Mom, I already know all that baby stuff," wails sixthgrader Eric, as he turns down another chance for some extrawork on phonics, spelling rules and legible handwriting. Sound familiar?

Along with a gifted second grader, and a youngish, but eager beginner, Mom, in this case, has her normally-capablehands more than full. We, at The Riggs Institute, hear all the familiar questions at least once a day: What can I do with Eric? I know he doesn't have everything he really needs although he does read fairly well. How can I help him? How can I handle this situation, and his negative attitude, along with my other two? How can I make him realize that he needs to learn more about language arts than just reading? He thinks reading is all there is, or needs to be!

Well, Mom needs to regain her composure first, and worksmarter, not harder, to overcome these commonplace problems. We advise her, and hundreds of others, with almost identical problems . . .

If Eric reads well, there is no reason for him not to learn the missing skills as an adult -- tackling the task as a college course in linguistics. Over the years, we've found several effective motivators.

First, tell him straight out -- and with good humor if you can manage it -- that he simply must learn correct English spelling patterns (the complete phonetic system), about 47 spelling, plural, and syllabication rules, how to apply them, and how to turn his speech into print with creative writing which he will, in turn, analyze for grammatical and syntactical content -- all for better thinking skills.

Second, if he learns it well, he will then be qualified to help instruct the younger children in the family. If he learns it as a potential teacher/tutor, he can also take this new-found skill next door to tutor other children for monetary gain. For many, this appeals more than mowing lawns or babysitting. It can also carry over to tutoring of peers at college level.

Third, he will become your teacher training partner. Whathe wants to teach, he must learn very thoroughly.

Fourth, to correct auditory processing skills, he does needto relearn manuscript letter formation through a dictationprocess. You may do this "game style" in a couple of shortlessons if you give only the instructions, and then have him tell you what he wrote.

This requires real listening! The Revised "Orton" phonograms from The Writing and Spelling Road to Reading and Thinking are shown here:

b c d f g h j k l m n p qu r s t v w x z / a e i o u y / er ir ur wor ear sh ee th ay/ai ow/ou oy/oi aw/au ew/eu ui oo ch ng ea ar ck ed or wh oa ey/ei ie igh tch eigh wr ph dge oe kn gn gh ti si ci ough

These sound/symbol combinations are the missing link in"the great debate" -- the commonly-used correct spellingpatterns needed to spell the 42 sounds of English speech. You needn't use our entire curriculum, but you can teach the phonograms "explicitly" (in isolation, and without key words or pictures), as compiled research (see BNR below) supports with our audio CD of the revised Orton phonograms -- using full multisensory instruction. These phonograms teach the 118 phoneme/grapheme combinations (only teachers use the key words). The printed booklet with masters for making worksheets lists, in print, with sample words, the 47 rules of spelling, plurals and syllabication which we use. It also explains the multi-sensory teaching technique to reach all "learning styles" without discrimination.

1. Anderson, R., Becoming a Nation of Readers, Univ. of Ill.--

~ The following sound/symbol relationships are most efficiently applied in dictated spelling lessons. However, they may also be taken directly to any (familiar and/or unfamiliar) words found in reading, writing, vocabulary development and spelling exercises. Try it with the e-mail above.

~ Forty-two phonemes (sounds) within 75 graphemes (letters) - the commonly used correct written spelling patterns of spoken English ... a e i o u b c d f g h j k l m n p qu r s t v w x y z er ur ir wor ear ay/ai ow/ou aw/au oy/oi eu/ew ei/ey ui/uy sh th ch wh ph gh rh pn gn kn ee ea ie oe oo oa wr ng ck or ed tch igh dge ti si ci eigh ough

~ Sort of like "hidden pictures" in a paragraph. More Info at http://www.riggsinst.org

Wednesday, June 15, 2005

Wikipedia posting

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

"The Belly and the Other Members", sometimes called "The Belly and the Members", is considered the world's oldest body-state metaphor. Written by Aesop, the short, simple fable describes a revolt of the body's parts against the stomach, as the stomach gets all of the food. After refusing to supply the stomach with nourishment, the "other members" realize they, too, are weakened. They realize that the stomach provides valuable hard work in its own way, and for their own good. The moral of the story is that the hard work and contributions of others are not always immediately recognizable as such, and that one part's suffering can result in the suffering of the whole.

The Apostle Paul, educated in both Hebrew and Hellenic thought, updated it when he wrote a letter to friends in Corinth (1 Cor. 12:12-26). It was also updated by Shakespeare in Act 1 of his play, "Coriolanus." Many versions of it are found all over the world. As human governance moves beyond the animalistic nature of the zoo-like politics portrayed by Civil War illustrator Thomas Nast's elephant and donkey for the major U.S. "parties," this tale can be revisited to great benefit; the stomach is analogous to the executive branch, the lungs are analogous to the legislative branch, and the heart is analogous to the judicial branch.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Belly_and_the_Other_Members"

Friday, May 20, 2005

Thomas Nast's zoo and Aesop's "Belly and the Other Members"

The donkey and elephant of American politics is credited to Thomas Nast; so is the secular Santa.

Aesop's Fable "Belly and the Other Members" has some promise as an alternative metaphor for governance. It could be better than the zoo and animalistic entertainment we associate with "politics."

What say others? This blogging thing is new, so have some patience.

Thursday, May 19, 2005

no more waiting

No More Waiting (June 2005 Reader's Digest, page 194)

You make a doctor's appointment, but when it rolls around a month later, you forget about it, no longer deem it necessary or are too busy to go.

But a growing number of practices are shifting to same-day scheduling -- you call for an appointment and get seen that day.

The theory is this: If doctors treat patients immediately, fewer patients will blow off future appointments. Researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the state health department tested the approach at one clinic. Before same-day scheduling, only 57% of patients showed up for appointments, often booked way in advance.

Once the new system was up and running, patients kept appointments 81% of the time.

~ Juxtaposed for your response(s):


On Tue, 19 Apr 2005 8:25, Deshotel, Clopha wrote:
> SMALL-GROUP INDEPENDENT STUDY
>
> (page 252 McKeachie’s Teaching Tips 2002)
>
> Favorable results on independent study were obtained in the
> experiments carried out at the University of Colorado by Gruber and Weitman (1960).
> In a course in first-year English in which the group met only about 90
> percent of the regularly scheduled hours and had little formal
> training on grammar, the self-directed study group was significantly
> superior to control groups on a test of grammar.
In a course in
> physical optics, groups of students who attended class without the
> instructor but were free to consult him learned fewer facts and simple
> applications, but were superior to students in conventional classes in
> difficult applications and learning new material. Moreover, the areas
> of superiority were maintained in a retest three months later when the
> difference in factual knowledge had disappeared. In educational
> psychology, an experimental class of five or six students without the
> instructor was equal to a conventional three-lecture-a-week class in
> mastery of content, and tended to be superior on measures of curiosity.
> See chapter (15) on active learning for tips on guiding small groups.
>
Updating the Alumnus Coloring Book (pdf) http://www.tomoyama.com/preparehope/cb092603.pdf with http://www.xanga.com/elizabethdeshotel and http://panamhwyandbeyond.blogspot.com

Friday, May 06, 2005

Writing Workshops possible at The Green Cottage?

That is at http://www.thegreencottage.net , the writing workshops, that is.

http://www.insidehighered.comnews/2005/05/04/writing

Failing Grade

The new writing tests that have been added to both the SAT and the ACT:

A. Are unlikely to predict success in college writing.
B. Will send high school writing instruction in the wrong direction.
C. Reward those who write “conventional truisms and platitudes about life.”
D. All of the above.

According to the National Council of Teachers of English, the answer is D.

The council released an analysis of the new writing tests Tuesday, and it found little to like and much to dislike.

The writing tests were introduced this year following years of criticism that the standardized tests used by many competitive colleges ignored the importance of writing. The College Board made the writing test a required part of the SAT and instituted a new scoring system, first used on the administration of the SAT given in March. The writing component is optional on the ACT.

The emphasis of the new report is on the SAT, although the authors of the report – a panel of seven that included six college professors – said that they believed most of the concerns applied equally to both tests.

Much of the criticism relates to the format of the essay test, in which students have 25 minutes to produce an answer to a question. In March, the question related to the idea of majority rule. That kind of exercise is quite different, the report notes, from what college professors expect of students.

“The kind of writing skill required to do well on short, timed essay tests has little instructional validity,” the report says. “Given only 25 minutes to write the SAT essay (30 minutes for the ACT essay), students will likely produce a kind of writing that is necessarily formulaic and superficial — writing that is very different from the lengthier, in-depth, and complex writing expected by most college instructors.”

As a result, the report says, the writing test will end up telling colleges very little about how well students can perform in college.

The danger posed by the new test, the report warns, is much greater than just wasting the time of the students who take it (and the money of those who prepare for it with test-prep services). High school writing instruction is likely to be shifted away from sound techniques to align with the new test.

...insert: Mapping Spoken English to Bookprint through Legible Handwriting? Use the 42 phonemes (sounds) within 75 graphemes (letters) - the commonly used correct English spelling patterns: a e i o u b c d f g h j k l m n p qu r s t v w x y z er ur ir wor ear ay/ai ow/ou aw/au oy/oi eu/ew ei/ey ui/uy sh th ch wh ph gh rh pn gn kn ee ea ie oe oo oa wr ng ck ar or ed tch igh dge ti si ci eigh ough

These sound/symbol relationships are most efficiently applied in carefully sequenced dictated spelling lessons. However, they may also be taken directly to any (familiar and/or unfamiliar) words found in reading, writing, vocabulary development and spelling exercises.



“The kind of writing required for success on the timed essay component of the SAT is likely to encourage writing instruction that emphasizes formulaic writing with specific but limited textual features,” the report says. “The sample prompts provided by the College Board include writing tasks that are generally decontextualized and artificial, with no reference to the crucial rhetorical matters of audience and purpose.

“Students are provided topics about which they may have little or no knowledge (or interest), yet they are instructed to ’support your reasoning with examples taken from your reading, studies, experience, or observations.’ Teachers wishing to help students prepare for such writing tasks will necessarily provide students with strategies focused on the specific textual features identified by the College Board’s promotional materials as important.

Careful, in-depth inquiry into a topic, attention to stylistic or structural features that may be suitable for specific audiences or rhetorical situations, creativity and innovation – all of these important components of effective writing are likely to be implicitly or explicitly discouraged by teachers will understandably be concerned about helping students manage the required writing tasks in the short allotted time.”

Officials of both the College Board and ACT strongly disputed the assertions of the report.

(...duh...)

Chiara Coletti, a spokeswoman for the College Board, said she wouldn’t even call the report representative of the English teachers’ association. She noted that many members of the group are involved in College Board committees related to the SAT and not only support, but have helped to develop, the writing test.

Coletti said that the College Board has never claimed that the writing test is capable of testing skills in creative writing or producing a research paper. But she said that the new writing test is valuable for what it does do — give colleges a way to compare the writing skills of students nationally.

She also rejected the idea that the test will hurt existing writing instruction in high schools. She noted recent studies that suggest that most high schools don’t do a good job of teaching writing. “It’s hard to understand why the task force would fear that this would take time away from high quality writing instruction,” Coletti said. “There’s not that much of it going on.”

Officials at the ACT also noted that they had involved NCTE members in developing their test, and they shared the College Board’s view that the writing test is just one method for encouraging good writing and shouldn’t be judged as the sole approach to that issue.

...insert: Mapping Spoken English to Bookprint through Legible Handwriting? Use the 42 phonemes (sounds) within 75 graphemes (letters) - the commonly used correct English spelling patterns: a e i o u b c d f g h j k l m n p qu r s t v w x y z er ur ir wor ear ay/ai ow/ou aw/au oy/oi eu/ew ei/ey ui/uy sh th ch wh ph gh rh pn gn kn ee ea ie oe oo oa wr ng ck ar or ed tch igh dge ti si ci eigh ough

These sound/symbol relationships are most efficiently applied in carefully sequenced dictated spelling lessons. However, they may also be taken directly to any (familiar and/or unfamiliar) words found in reading, writing, vocabulary development and spelling exercises.



Cathy Welch, assistant vice president of ACT for its Performance Assessment Center, said that the ACT’s approach — adding the writing test and making it optional — responded to college requests. About one-third of colleges surveyed wanted the ACT to add the test, she said, and the organization wanted to oblige, but it didn’t want to force the test on the majority of colleges that didn’t want it.

Welch also said that the ACT takes a different approach to essay topics on its writing test — so the criticism in the English teachers’ report does not apply. “Our prompts cover issues that high school students deal with every day, issues that are relevant to their lives,” Welch said.

Examples include: Should high schools adopt dress codes for students? Should high schools adopt “good conduct” policies for athletes on school sports teams?

Scott Jaschik

Mapping Spoken English to Bookprint through Legible Handwriting? Use the 42 phonemes (sounds) within 75 graphemes (letters) - the commonly used correct English spelling patterns: a e i o u b c d f g h j k l m n p qu r s t v w x y z er ur ir wor ear ay/ai ow/ou aw/au oy/oi eu/ew ei/ey ui/uy sh th ch wh ph gh rh pn gn kn ee ea ie oe oo oa wr ng ck ar or ed tch igh dge ti si ci eigh ough

These sound/symbol relationships are most efficiently applied in carefully sequenced dictated spelling lessons. However, they may also be taken directly to any (familiar and/or unfamiliar) words found in reading, writing, vocabulary development and spelling exercises.

Monday, May 02, 2005

Background on Anti-Boredom Board Game

Please Take a Look at the Preparation Material BEFORE coming to the workshop (el taller); find it online - clophad@yahoo.com - ask for a hard copy (una copia).

Then, please read the material and make notes of the first thoughts (primeras ideas) you have while reading through it.

This may open a few new doors (puertas)!

It will certainly make our conversation time more enjoyable (mas agradable).

_________________


Por favor revise el material de preparaccion antes de que comienze el taller; El Material lo puede obtener en la red electronica clophad@yahoo.com o pida una copia en el salon B-116 HCC.

A continuacion tome nota de las primeras ideas que tuvo mientras leia el material.

Esto proablemente abrira nuevas puertas! Pero Definitivamente dara lugar a conversaciones mas agradables.